GitHub Integration

SonarQube's integration with GitHub Enterprise and GitHub.com allows you to maintain code quality and security in your GitHub repositories.

With this integration, you'll be able to:

  • Import your GitHub repositories - Import your GitHub repositories into SonarQube to easily set up SonarQube projects.
  • Analyze projects with GitHub Actions - Integrate analysis into your build pipeline. Starting in Developer Edition, SonarScanners running in GitHub Actions jobs can automatically detect branches or pull requests being built so you don't need to specifically pass them as parameters to the scanner.
  • Report your Quality Gate status to your branches and pull requests - (starting in Developer Edition) See your Quality Gate and code metric results right in GitHub so you know if it's safe to merge your changes.
  • Authenticate with GitHub - Sign in to SonarQube with your GitHub credentials.

Prerequisites

  • To add pull request decoration to Checks in GitHub Enterprise, you must be running GitHub Enterprise version 2.21+.
  • To analyze projects with GitHub Actions in GitHub Enterprise, you must be running GitHub Enterprise version 3.0+.

Branch Analysis

Community Edition doesn't support the analysis of multiple branches, so you can only analyze your main branch. With Developer Edition, you can analyze multiple branches and pull requests.

Importing your GitHub repositories to SonarQube

You need to use a GitHub App to connect SonarQube and GitHub so you can import your GitHub repositories into SonarQube. This is also the first step in adding authentication and, if you're using Developer Edition or above, the first step in adding pull request decoration.

If you want to set up authentication without importing your GitHub repositories, see the Creating a dedicated app for authentication section below for instructions on setting up authentication.

In this section, you'll complete the following steps to connect SonarQube and GitHub with a GitHub App:

  1. Create your GitHub App.
  2. Install your GitHub App in your organization.
  3. Update your SonarQube global settings with your GitHub App information.

Step 1: Creating your GitHub App

See GitHub's documentation on creating a GitHub App for general information on creating your app.

Specify the following settings in your app:

  • GitHub App Name – Your app's name.
  • Homepage URL – You can use any URL, such as https://www.sonarqube.org/.
  • User authorization callback URL – Your instance's base URL. For example, https://yourinstance.sonarqube.com.
  • Webhook URL – Your instance's base URL. For example, https://yourinstance.sonarqube.com.
  • Grant access for the following Repository permissions:

    PermissionAccess
    ChecksRead & write
    GitHub Enterprise: Repository metadata
    GitHub.com: Metadata
    (this setting is automatically set by GitHub)
    Read-only
    Pull RequestsRead & write
    Commit statusesRead-only
  • For private repositories, grant access to the following Repository permissions:

    PermissionAccess
    ContentsRead-only
  • If setting up GitHub Authentication, in addition to the aforementioned Repository permissions, grant access for the following User permissions:

    PermissionAccess
    Email addressesRead-only

    And grant access for the following Organization permissions:

    PermissionAccess
    MembersRead-only
    ProjectsRead-only
  • Under "Where can this GitHub App be installed?," select Any account.

For security reasons, make sure you're using HTTPS protocol for your URLs in your app.

Step 2: Installing your GitHub App in your organization

Next, you need to install your GitHub App in your organizations. See GitHub's documentation on installing GitHub Apps for more information.

Step 3: Updating your SonarQube global settings with your GitHub App information

After you've created and installed your GitHub App, update your global SonarQube settings to finish integration and allow for the import of GitHub projects.

Navigate to Administration > Configuration > General Settings > ALM Integrations > GitHub and specify the following settings:

  • Configuration Name (Enterprise and Data Center Edition only) – The name used to identify your GitHub configuration at the project level. Use something succinct and easily recognizable.
  • GitHub URL – For example, https://github.company.com/api/v3 for GitHub Enterprise or https://api.github.com/ for GitHub.com.
  • GitHub App ID – The App ID is found on your GitHub App's page on GitHub at Settings > Developer Settings > GitHub Apps.
  • Client ID – The Client ID is found on your GitHub App's page.
  • Client secret – The Client secret is found on your GitHub App's page.
  • Private Key – Your GitHub App's private key. You can generate a .pem file from your GitHub App's page under Private keys. Copy and paste the whole contents of the file here.

Analyzing projects with GitHub Actions

SonarScanners running in GitHub Actions can automatically detect branches and pull requests being built so you don't need to specifically pass them as parameters to the scanner.

To analyze your projects with GitHub Actions, you need to:

  • Create your GitHub Secrets.
  • Configure your workflow YAML file.
  • Commit and push your code to start the analysis.

Creating your GitHub Secrets

You can create repository secrets from your GitHub repository. See GitHub's documentation on Encrypted secrets for more information.

You need to set the following GitHub repository secrets to analyze your projects with GitHub Actions:

  • SONAR_TOKEN – Generate a SonarQube token and, in GitHub, create a new repository secret in GitHub with SONAR_TOKEN as the Name and the token you generated as the Value.
  • SONAR_HOST_URL – In GitHub, create a new repository secret with SONAR_HOST_URL as the Name and your SonarQube server URL as the Value.

Configuring your .github/workflows/build.yml file

This section shows you how to configure your .github/workflows/build.yml file.

You'll set up your build according to your SonarQube edition:

  • Community Edition – Community Edition doesn't support multiple branches, so you should only analyze your main branch. You can restrict analysis to your main branch by setting it as the only branch in your on.push.branches configuration in your workflow YAML file, and not using on.pull_request.
  • Developer Edition and above – GitHub Actions can build specific branches and pull requests if you use on.push.branches and on.pull-requests configurations as shown in the examples below.

Click the scanner you're using below to expand the example configuration:

SonarScanner for Maven

Note: A project key might have to be provided through a pom.xml file, or through the command line parameter. For more information, see the SonarScanner for Maven documentation.

Write the following in your workflow YAML file:

name: Build
on:
  push:
    branches:
      - master # or the name of your main branch
  pull_request:
    types: [opened, synchronize, reopened]
jobs:
  build:
    name: Build
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
        with:
          fetch-depth: 0  # Shallow clones should be disabled for a better relevancy of analysis
      - name: Set up JDK 11
        uses: actions/setup-java@v1
        with:
          java-version: 11
      - name: Cache SonarQube packages
        uses: actions/cache@v1
        with:
          path: ~/.sonar/cache
          key: ${{ runner.os }}-sonar
          restore-keys: ${{ runner.os }}-sonar
      - name: Cache Maven packages
        uses: actions/cache@v1
        with:
          path: ~/.m2
          key: ${{ runner.os }}-m2-${{ hashFiles('**/pom.xml') }}
          restore-keys: ${{ runner.os }}-m2
      - name: Build and analyze
        env:
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}  # Needed to get PR information, if any
          SONAR_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.SONAR_TOKEN }}
          SONAR_HOST_URL: ${{ secrets.SONAR_HOST_URL }}
        run: mvn -B verify org.sonarsource.scanner.maven:sonar-maven-plugin:sonar

SonarScanner for Gradle

Note: A project key might have to be provided through a build.gradle file, or through the command line parameter. For more information, see the SonarScanner for Gradle documentation.

Add the following to your build.gradle file:

plugins {
  id "org.sonarqube" version "3.3"
}

Write the following in your workflow YAML file:

name: Build
on:
  push:
    branches:
      - master # or the name of your main branch
  pull_request:
    types: [opened, synchronize, reopened]
jobs:
  build:
    name: Build
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
        with:
          fetch-depth: 0  # Shallow clones should be disabled for a better relevancy of analysis
      - name: Set up JDK 11
        uses: actions/setup-java@v1
        with:
          java-version: 11
      - name: Cache SonarQube packages
        uses: actions/cache@v1
        with:
          path: ~/.sonar/cache
          key: ${{ runner.os }}-sonar
          restore-keys: ${{ runner.os }}-sonar
      - name: Cache Gradle packages
        uses: actions/cache@v1
        with:
          path: ~/.gradle/caches
          key: ${{ runner.os }}-gradle-${{ hashFiles('**/*.gradle') }}
          restore-keys: ${{ runner.os }}-gradle
      - name: Build and analyze
        env:
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}  # Needed to get PR information, if any
          SONAR_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.SONAR_TOKEN }}
          SONAR_HOST_URL: ${{ secrets.SONAR_HOST_URL }}
        run: ./gradlew build sonarqube --info 

SonarScanner for .NET

Write the following in your workflow YAML file:

name: Build
on:
  push:
    branches:
      - master # or the name of your main branch
  pull_request:
    types: [opened, synchronize, reopened]
jobs:
  build:
    name: Build
    runs-on: windows-latest
    steps:
      - name: Set up JDK 11
        uses: actions/setup-java@v1
        with:
          java-version: 1.11
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
        with:
          fetch-depth: 0  # Shallow clones should be disabled for a better relevancy of analysis
      - name: Cache SonarQube packages
        uses: actions/cache@v1
        with:
          path: ~\sonar\cache
          key: ${{ runner.os }}-sonar
          restore-keys: ${{ runner.os }}-sonar
      - name: Cache SonarQube scanner
        id: cache-sonar-scanner
        uses: actions/cache@v1
        with:
          path: .\.sonar\scanner
          key: ${{ runner.os }}-sonar-scanner
          restore-keys: ${{ runner.os }}-sonar-scanner
      - name: Install SonarQube scanner
        if: steps.cache-sonar-scanner.outputs.cache-hit != 'true'
        shell: powershell
        run: |
          New-Item -Path .\.sonar\scanner -ItemType Directory
          dotnet tool update dotnet-sonarscanner --tool-path .\.sonar\scanner
      - name: Build and analyze
        env:
          GITHUB_TOKEN: ${{ secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN }}  # Needed to get PR information, if any
        shell: powershell
        run: |
          .\.sonar\scanner\dotnet-sonarscanner begin /k:"example" /d:sonar.login="${{ secrets.SONAR_TOKEN }}" /d:sonar.host.url="${{ secrets.SONAR_HOST_URL }}"
          dotnet build
          .\.sonar\scanner\dotnet-sonarscanner end /d:sonar.login="${{ secrets.SONAR_TOKEN }}"

SonarScanner CLI

You can easily set up a basic configuration using the SonarQube Scan GitHub Action. You'll find the GitHub Action and configuration instructions on the SonarQube Scan GitHub Action page on the GitHub Marketplace.

Failing the pipeline job when the Quality Gate fails

You can use the SonarQube Quality Gate Check GitHub Action to ensure your code meets your quality standards by failing your pipeline job when your Quality Gate fails.

If you do not want to use the SonarQube Quality Gate Check Action, you can instruct the scanner to wait for the SonarQube Quality Gate status at the end of the analysis. To enable this, pass the -Dsonar.qualitygate.wait=true parameter to the scanner in the workflow YAML file.

This will make the analysis step poll SonarQube regularly until the Quality Gate is computed. This will increase your pipeline duration. Note that, if the Quality Gate is red, this will make the analysis step fail, even if the actual analysis itself is successful. We advise only using this parameter when necessary (for example, to block a deployment pipeline if the Quality Gate is red). It should not be used to report the Quality Gate status in a pull request, as this is already done with pull request decoration.

You can set the sonar.qualitygate.timeout property to an amount of time (in seconds) that the scanner should wait for a report to be processed. The default is 300 seconds.

Commit and push your code

Commit and push your code to start the analysis. Each new push you make on your branches or pull requests will trigger a new analysis in SonarQube.

Reporting your Quality Gate status in GitHub

After creating and installing your GitHub App above, SonarQube can report your Quality Gate status and analysis metrics directly to your GitHub branches and pull requests.

To do this, add a project from GitHub by clicking the Add project button in the upper-right corner of the Projects homepage and select GitHub from the drop-down menu.

Then, follow the steps in SonarQube to analyze your project. SonarQube automatically sets the project settings required to show your Quality Gate in your branches and pull requests.

To report your Quality Gate status in your branches and pull requests, a SonarQube analysis needs to be run on your code. You can find the additional parameters required for pull request analysis on the Pull Request Analysis page.

If you're creating your projects manually or adding Quality Gate reporting to an existing project, see the following section.

Reporting your Quality Gate status in manually created or existing projects

SonarQube can also report your Quality Gate status to GitHub pull requests and branches for existing and manually-created projects. After you've created and installed your GitHub App and updated your global ALM Integration settings as shown in the Importing your GitHub repositories into SonarQube section above, set the following project settings at Project Settings > General Settings > DevOps Platform Integration:

  • Configuration name – The configuration name that corresponds to your GitHub instance.
  • Repository identifier – The path of your repository URL.

Advanced configuration

Reporting your Quality Gate status on pull requests and branches in a mono repository

Reporting Quality Gate statuses to branches and pull requests in a mono repository setup is supported starting in Enterprise Edition.

In a mono repository setup, multiple SonarQube projects, each corresponding to a separate project within the mono repository, are all bound to the same GitHub repository. You'll need to set up each SonarQube project that's part of a mono repository to report your Quality Gate status.

You need to set up projects that are part of a mono repository manually as shown in the Displaying your Quality Gate status in manually created or existing project section above. You also need to set the Enable mono repository support setting to true at Project Settings > General Settings > DevOps Platform Integration.

After setting your project settings, ensure that the correct project is being analyzed by adjusting the analysis scope and pass your project names to the scanner. See the following sections for more information.

Ensuring the correct project is analyzed

You need to adjust the analysis scope to make sure SonarQube doesn't analyze code from other projects in your mono repository. To do this set up a Source File Inclusion for your project at Project Settings > Analysis Scope with a pattern that will only include files from the appropriate folder. For example, adding ./MyFolderName/**/* to your inclusions would only include analysis of code in the MyFolderName folder. See Narrowing the Focus for more information on setting your analysis scope.

Passing project names to the scanner

Because of the nature of a mono repository, SonarQube scanners might read all project names of your mono repository as identical. To avoid having multiple projects with the same name, you need to pass the sonar.projectName parameter to the scanner. For example, if you're using the Maven scanner, you would pass mvn sonar:sonar -Dsonar.projectName=YourProjectName.

Showing your analysis summary under the GitHub Conversation tab

By default, Enable analysis summary under the GitHub Conversation tab is on and your pull request analysis will be shown under both the Conversation and Checks tabs in GitHub. When off, your pull request analysis summary is only shown under the Checks tab.

Configuring multiple ALM instances

SonarQube can report your Quality Gate status to multiple ALM instances. To do this, you need to create a configuration for each ALM instance and assign that configuration to the appropriate projects.

  • As part of Developer Edition, you can create one configuration for each ALM.
  • Starting in Enterprise Edition, you can create multiple configurations for each ALM. If you have multiple configurations of the same ALM connected to SonarQube, you have to create projects manually.

Linking issues

When adding a Quality Gate status to your pull requests and branches, individual issues will be linked to their SonarQube counterparts automatically. For this to work correctly, you need to set the instance's Server base URL (Administration > Configuration > General Settings > General > General) correctly. Otherwise, the links will default to localhost.

Setting up GitHub authentication

To allow users to log in with GitHub credentials, use the GitHub App that you created above (see the Importing your GitHub repositories using a GitHub App section for more information) and update your global SonarQube settings.

If you're using Community Edition or you want to use a dedicated app for GitHub authentication, see the Creating a dedicated app for authentication section below.

To update your global SonarQube settings:

Navigate to Administration > Configuration > General Settings > ALM Integrations > GitHub > GitHub Authentication and update the following:

  1. Enabled – set the switch to true.
  2. Client ID – the Client ID is found below the GitHub App ID on your GitHub App's page.
  3. Client Secret – the Client secret is found below the Client ID on your GitHub App's page.

Now, from the login page, your users can connect their GitHub accounts with the new "Log in with GitHub" button.

Creating a dedicated app for authentication

If you want to use a dedicated app for GitHub authentication, you can create a GitHub OAuth app. You'll find general instructions for creating a GitHub OAuth App here. Specify the following settings in your OAuth App:

  • Homepage URL – the public URL of your SonarQube server. For example, https://sonarqube.mycompany.com. For security reasons, HTTP is not supported, and you must use HTTPS. The public URL is configured in SonarQube at Administration > General > Server base URL.
  • Authorization callback URL – your instance's base URL. For example, https://yourinstance.sonarqube.com.

After creating your app, update your global SonarQube settings:

Navigate to Administration > Configuration > General Settings > ALM Integrations > GitHub > GitHub Authentication and update the following:

  1. Enabled – set the switch to true.
  2. Client ID – the Client ID is found below the GitHub App ID on your GitHub App's page.
  3. Client Secret – the Client secret is found below the Client ID on your GitHub App's page.

Now, from the login page, your users can connect their GitHub accounts with the new "Log in with GitHub" button.